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  • [MINIATURE ALMANACH.]
    Amour et Gloire. Paris, Marcilly, 1827.

    128mo, (27 x 19 mm), pp. 63, [1], engraved frontispiece on the verso of the title-page, seven further engraved plates included in the pagination, in contemporary red morocco, single filet gilt with inner roll-tool border and central design of a single flower stem with two flowers in the centre of each cover, gilt stars on the spine, gilt edges.

    A delightful microscopic almanac published by Marcilly, one of the leading publishers of miniature almanacs in Paris from the 1790s well into the nineteenth century.… (more)

    A delightful microscopic almanac published by Marcilly, one of the leading publishers of miniature almanacs in Paris from the 1790s well into the nineteenth century. It is in the typical format, comprising pp. 64, including the calendar, and containing a number of sentimental songs with fine engraved plates to accompany the songs. The name of the tune to which the song is to be sung is also given. Songs include ‘L’Ingenu’, ‘L’Absence’ and ‘L’Orage’. The eight engraved plates are absolutely charming.
    Gumuchian notes that Georges Salomon had an issue with the name of E. Jourdan in place of Marcilly.

    Grand-Carteret 2060; Gumuchian 4056; not in Bondy.

    Not in OCLC.

    View basket More details Price: £750.00
  • Anecdotes of Eminent Painters in Spain, by CUMBERLAND, Richard (1732-1811).
    CUMBERLAND, Richard (1732-1811).
    Anecdotes of Eminent Painters in Spain, during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries; with cursory remarks upon the present state of arts in that kingdom. By Richard Cumberland. In two volumes. Vol. I [-II]. London, J. Walter, 1782.

    First Edition. Two volumes, 12mo (156 x 95 mm), pp. [iv], 225, [1], [2] index; [iv], 224, [1] index, [1], in contemporary tree calf, spines ruled in compartments and numbered in gilt, red morocco labels lettered in gilt.

    A handsome copy of this guide to Spanish art written by the dramatist and diplomat, Richard Cumberland. Public awareness of the art and artists of… (more)

    A handsome copy of this guide to Spanish art written by the dramatist and diplomat, Richard Cumberland. Public awareness of the art and artists of Spain was growing as travellers made comparisons with the work of the Italian masters. Collectors and dealers were beginning to look towards Spain as a new source of supply and Cumberland’s detailed work was a great success. It was based in part on Cumberland’s observations made in Spain and in part on Antonio Palomino’s Vidas de los pintores y estatuarios eminentes españoles, which was translated into English in 1739.
    In 1780, Cumberland was sent on a confidential mission to Spain in order to negotiate a peace treaty during the American War of Independence that would weaken the anti-British coalition. Although he was well received by Charles III of Spain and his government, the sovereignty of Gibraltar proved insurmountable and Cumberland was forced to return to England empty handed. The government then refused to repay his expenses, even though he was out of pocket to the tune of £4500, a blow to his finances that he never really recovered from. One of the few positive results of his time in Spain was the research that he did for this book.
    ‘I had already published in two volumes my Anecdotes of eminent Painters in Spain. I am flattered to believe’, Cumberland wrote, ‘it was an interesting and curious work to readers of a certain sort, for there had been no such regular history of the Spanish School in our language, and when I added to it the authentic catalogue of the paintings in the royal palace at Madrid, I gave the world what it had not seen before as that catalogue was the first that had been made and was by permission of the King of Spain undertaken at my request and transmitted to me after my return to England’ (Memoirs of Richard Cumberland, 1806, pp. 298-299).

    ESTC t116936.

    View basket More details Price: £650.00
  • Ideas for Rustic Furniture; by WRIGHTE, William
    WRIGHTE, William
    Ideas for Rustic Furniture; proper for Garden Seats, Summer Houses, Hermitages, Cottages, &c. on 25 plates. London, I. & J. Taylor, the Architectural Library, circa 1800.

    First Edition. 8vo, (235 x 145 mm), 25 engraved plates including the title, some staining, particularly to the title-page, in slightly later marbled wrappers, binding sprung and partly broken, possibly the result of an early and not very successful restoration project, consequently several of the plates are loose, yellow edges.

    A delightful suite of plates showing designs for rustic furniture to be used either in the garden or inside modest country dwellings or cottages. Fourteen… (more)

    A delightful suite of plates showing designs for rustic furniture to be used either in the garden or inside modest country dwellings or cottages. Fourteen designs for chairs are included on the first seven plates, two long stools, four sofas (decorative but perhaps rather uncomfortable), three tables, one bason [sic] stand, six mirrors on three plates and three large chimney pieces. The title-page and final leaf, both unnumbered, are captioned ‘Frontispiece’ and represent decorative entrances and exits to a garden. Wright is mostly remembered for his very popular Grotesque Architecture, which was first published in 1767 and ran to numerous editions. A much larger work than the present, it included a number of rustic seats as well as architectural and garden plans.

    ESTC t146494, at BL, RIBA, The National Trust, V & A and Massachusetts Institute of Technology only; the Met also has a copy.

    View basket More details Price: £2,000.00
  • PEACOCK, James (1738-1814).
    OIKIDIA, or, Nutshells: being Ichnographic Distributions for Small Villas; chiefly upon oeconomical principles. In seven classes. With occasional remarks. By Jose Mac Packe, a Bricklayer’s Labourer. Part the first, containing Twelve Designs. London, for the Author, 1785.

    First Edition. 8vo, (212 x 121mm), two engraved frontispieces and pp. [iv], 89, with numerous tables in the text and twenty-five engraved plates, each facing its description, the text proper being in the appendix, beginning at p. 51, plate xviii misnumbered xvii, in contemporary calf, red morocco label on spine lettered in gilt, spine ruled in gilt, foot of spine chipped, joints cracking and in need of some attention, but generally an attractive copy, with the early ownership inscription of James McDouall of Lagan.

    A charming book written as a guide to the ordinary person wishing to build a house in the country. Peacock had worked as principal assistant… (more)

    A charming book written as a guide to the ordinary person wishing to build a house in the country. Peacock had worked as principal assistant to the architect George Dance and as Clerk of Works to the City of London Corporation and therefore had considerable experience, belying the anagrammatic pseudonym ‘Jose Mac Packe’, a ‘bricklayer’s assistant’, as given on the title page. He fears that some might suspect this and reassures them as to his station in life, expressing the hope that ‘the sourest critic will upon the whole allow, that he has acquitted himself as well as might be expected for a Bricklayer’s Labourer’ (Preface). The twenty-five plates give plans of examples with comments and detailed measurements, showing Peacock’s skill with relatively small sites. The appendix (which, written under the guise of bricklayer, includes some advice on how to deal with your architect) is a humorous guide for the layman on how to build his own house: ‘let him procure a design upon paper, of a new House... whether it be from some Fan-painter, Toy-man, Lace-man, Paper-hanger, or Undertaker... if it happens to be the production of a wonderful genius, not of the profession, it will not be unwise in him to consult some clumsy mechanic, or other, who can readily distinguish a brick from a pantile’ (pp. 53-54).

    Eileen Harris, British Architectural Books and Writers 1556–1785, 694; Berlin Katalog 2295.

    ESTC t42147.

    View basket More details Price: £650.00
  • ‘the father of English architectural history’
    WREN, Christopher (1645-1747).
    Parentalia: or, Memoirs of the Family of the Wrens; viz. of Mathew Bishop of Ely, Christopher Dean of Windsor, &c. But chiefly of Sir Christopher Wren, late Surveyor-General of the Royal Buildings, President of the Royal Society, &c. &c. In which is contained, besides his Works, a great Number of Original Papers and Records; on Religion, Politicks, Anatomy, Mathematics, Architecture, Antiquities; and most Branches of Polite Literature. Compiled by his Son Christopher; Now published by his Grandson, Stephen Wren, Esq; With the Care of Joseph Ames, F.R.S. and Secretary to the Society of Antiquaries, London. London, T. Osborn, 1750.

    First Edition. Folio, (305 x 212mm), mezzotint frontispiece portrait of Christopher Wren (the son, compiler of Parentalia) by John Faber and pp. [ii], xii, ii, [iv], 120, 125-159, [1], 181-368, [3] index, [1] directions to the bookbinder, title-page printed in red and black, three further engraved portraits and eight engraved plates, final plate slightly cropped at the foot, three half page engravings and a final engraved tail-piece, marginal wormholing in the first couple of leaves, in contemporary calf, rather worn, plain spine simply ruled in compartments, brown morocco label lettered in gilt, covers and extremities scuffed, joints cracking, head of spine and upper joints badly chipped, with the contemporary Dacre bookplate and later ‘GBS’ bookplate, early manuscript shelf mark and scribbles.

    One of the earliest biographies of Sir Christopher Wren and a chief source of information about his life and work, gathered from the family papers.… (more)

    One of the earliest biographies of Sir Christopher Wren and a chief source of information about his life and work, gathered from the family papers. Originally written by his son, also Christopher Wren, who had died before completing it, the work was finally published after his death by Wren’s grandson. The largest section of the work is dedicated to the life and achievements of Sir Christopher Wren, but the earlier parts give details of his forebears, Matthew Wren (pp. 1-134) and Christopher Wren (pp. 135-159). Parentalia also lists Wren's inventions before 1660: ‘Devices for surveying, musical and acoustical instruments, developments in fishing, underwater construction and submarine navigation, and experiments in printmaking; he experimented with, but did not invent, the mezzotint technique, which Prince Rupert demonstrated to the Royal Society in 1661’ (DNB). The Appendix contains material from some rough draughts under the title ‘Of Architecture; and Observations on Antique Temples, &c.’ (pp. 351-368). With a mezzotint portrait of Christopher Wren by John Faber, 1750, and other plates by Thorowgood, G. Vandergucht, and J. Mynde. The plates of the Sheldonian theatre and Temple of Diana drawn by H. Flitcroft and the tail-piece engraved by J. Pine.
    ‘While as a biographer [Wren] is demonstrably inaccurate, his accuracy in transcribing Wren’s ‘blotted and interlin’d’ manuscripts is impossible to assess owing to the loss of the originals. He was at pains to point out that these were ‘only the First rough Draughts, not perfected, nor intended by him for the Press’ and perhaps for that reason felt free to make interpolations and marginal notes to the ‘Tracts’... As a biography of an English architect, Parentalia is preceded only by the ‘Memoirs Relating to the Life and Writings of Inigo Jones, Esq. prefixed to the second edition of Stone Heng Restored, (1725). Parentalia must however be granted the distinction of being the father of English architectural history and was described as such in the late eighteenth by James Essex’ (Harris p. 504).

    Harris 949.

    View basket More details Price: £2,500.00
  • ‘the most elegant of English eighteenth-century books’
    Quinti Horatii Flacci Opera. by HORACE. PINE, John (1690-1756), engraver.
    HORACE. PINE, John (1690-1756), engraver.
    Quinti Horatii Flacci Opera. Vol. I [-II]. London, John Pine, 1733.

    First Edition, second state of vol. II p. 108 with the inscription on the medal of Augustus Caesar in the corrected state of ‘potest’. Two volumes, 8vo, (221 x 130 mm), pp. [xxxii], 176, [2], [177]-264, [2], first end final pages blank; [xxiv], 48, [2], [49]-94, [2], [95]-152, [2], [153]-172, [2], [173]-191, [1] blank, [13] explanation of the plates, printed entirely from engraved plates, some light foxing and offsetting, in contemporary crimson morocco, triple gilt filet borders to covers, gilt spines with raised bands and contrasting brown morocco labels, marbled endpapers, gilt edges, some slight wear to the bindings with a little bit of surface abrasion and staining.

    One of the most famous engraved books of the eighteenth century: ‘the most elegant of English eighteenth-century books in which text and illustrations alike are… (more)

    One of the most famous engraved books of the eighteenth century: ‘the most elegant of English eighteenth-century books in which text and illustrations alike are entirely engraved’ (Ray p. 3). Pine’s work was inspired by French book design and in turn it had a profound effect on English typography. Its magnificent plates, illustration and typography have made it a staple of book collecting ever since. The work was intended only as a deluxe edition and it was not issued in workaday bindings. Here it is in a simple but beautiful red morocco binding. On any other book, this might suggest a particularly special copy but for Pine’s Horace, it was probably a trade binding, for over the counter sales.
    The text was first set in type and a proof transferred to the copper plates to be engraved letter by letter, the headpieces, decorated initials, tailpieces and full page illustrations then engraved on the same plates. ‘The brilliancy of this engraved roman text struck a new note, and thus Pine’s Horace may have had a good deal to do with the taste for more “finished” types which waxed as the century waned.’ (Updike II, p. 138.) In this sense, Pine paved the way for Baskerville and Bodoni and, like them, he generously spaced his lines. In his address to the reader, Pine draws attention not only to the brightness (nitore) of his letters but also to the fact that unlike movable type there is no chance of errors being introduced during printing.
    A prospectus was issued on 24 February 1731, with a list of subscribers and 67 plates, before the addition of the signature letters (ESTC N39784). The list of subscribers in the first volume, supplemented by that in volume II, brings the total to well over 1000 names, with separate sections for many European countries or capital cities. This must be one of the longest subscription lists in any eighteenth-century book.

    See Gordon Norton Ray, The illustrator and the book in England from 1790 to 1914 (1976); Daniel Berkeley Updike, Printing types, their history, forms and use (3rd edition, 1962).

    ESTC t46226; Brunet III, 320; Cohen-de Ricci 498.

    View basket More details Price: £1,600.00
  • ‘a familiar source for book illustration’
    Rudiments of Drawing; by CIPRIANI, Giovanni Battista (1727-1785).
    CIPRIANI, Giovanni Battista (1727-1785).
    Rudiments of Drawing; engraved by F. Bartolozzi. London, G. Bartolozzi and Mariano Bovi, 1786-93.

    Landscape oblong folio album, (385 x 268 mm), 18 stipple engraved plates (including the title-page), some spotting and soiling but the plates generally clean, plate mark 208 x 303 mm, in contemporary or slightly later roan backed marbled boards with worn edges, spine chipped at head and foot, extremities bumped, wanting the front endpaper.

    A composite album of engravings showing various life drawing studies. This is a similar collection to Elements for drawing, designed and engraved by Francis Bartolozzi,… (more)

    A composite album of engravings showing various life drawing studies. This is a similar collection to Elements for drawing, designed and engraved by Francis Bartolozzi, Esq. R.A. The originals in the possession of M. Bovi, London 1792 (ESTC n9122, at Glasgow, Yale and the Getty). That collection also included a letterpress title (not present here) and further engravings by Bartolozzi of his own works. Composite albums like this one would have been bound up to order, depending on the availability of the prints at the time. The present album contains eight plates after Cipriani and ten by Bartolozzi after originals in the collection of Mariano Bovi.
    Single plates with multiple images are dedicated to eyes, noses, ears and there are five plates of hands (adult and baby hands), and three of feet. The final six engraved plates are figurative studies including portraits of young men and women, children, cherubs and other heavenly beings.
    ‘Cipriani’s classical designs, well drawn and restrained in colour, became particularly associated with the neo-classical interiors created by Robert Adam and William Chambers... Rudiments of Drawing, engraved by Bartolozzi, was published posthumously in 1786-92, to become a familiar source for book illustration’ (ODNB).

    ESTC n9122, at Glasgow, Getty Center and Yale University Center for British Art.

    View basket More details Price: £2,600.00
  • Studien für geübtene Anfänger. Ein Duzend neüe abwechselnde Gegenden in Winterthur. by SCHELLENBERG, Johann Rudolph (1740-1806).
    SCHELLENBERG, Johann Rudolph (1740-1806).
    Studien für geübtene Anfänger. Ein Duzend neüe abwechselnde Gegenden in Winterthur. Winterthur, 1782.

    First Edition, Privately Distributed. 4to, (235 x 175 mm), engraved pictorial title page and 11 further numbered engraved plates, (plate marks between 157 and 151 x 112), the first plate with two landscape engravings one above the other, all the others single portrait landscapes, in contemporary olive green boards, worn at extremities, spine chipped.

    A delightful suite of plates for young children which appears to have been produced for private distribution by the artist to friends, pupils or patrons.… (more)

    A delightful suite of plates for young children which appears to have been produced for private distribution by the artist to friends, pupils or patrons. Evidently intended for presentation over a period of years, the title-page is dated ‘178-’, with the final digit left blank to be completed in manuscript: in this copy it has been filled in as ‘1782’. Lonchamp cites only examples filled in as ‘1783’ and ‘1784’, making this a fairly early presentation, though there is a known copy dated ‘1781’ (and one undated example, with the title-page left blank).
    The title page depicts a woodland scene with a little boy hard at work with his drawing board, accompanied by a thoughtful older girl, who looks out at the reader with a penetrating gaze. The first of the plates includes two scenes, both landscape format, one above the other, and both depicting water scenes with no figures. The other eleven plates are all portrait landscapes, depicting scenes around Winterthur, with mountains, dizzy ravines, farm scenes, rivers and waterfalls. All of these include figures relating in different ways to the landscape, such as little boys playing a game on a bridge over a river, an elegant figure gazing in awe at a distant waterfall and a naked girl who, sitting on a rock in the shallows of a lake, appears to be washing her feet.
    This collection, specifically intended for children, may have been born out of the success of Schellenberg’s twelve leaf folio collection of Swiss views, published in 1779. In 1786, the present suite was reprinted in a commercial edition in Augsburg under the direction of Annert.

    Lonchamp, Manuel du bibliophile suisse 2633; Rümann, Die illustrierten deutschen Bücher des 18. Jahrhunderts 1016.

    No copies traced in America.

    View basket More details Price: £3,500.00
  • BOUTET, Claude (fl. 1674-1708), attributed.
    The Art of Painting in Miniature: Teaching the speedy and perfect Acquisition of that Art without a Master. Done from the Original French. London, G. Smith [&c], 1729.

    First Edition in English. 8vo (170 x 100 mm), pp. [x], 100, [6], ornamental head- and tail-pieces, final pages a little creased, in contemporary unlettered panelled calf, some light wear, with the contemporary booklabel of Anna Maria Powell.

    A delightful guide to painting for the amateur artist, including detailed instructions on the preparation of colours, techniques for painting draperies, flowers, trees, landscapes and… (more)

    A delightful guide to painting for the amateur artist, including detailed instructions on the preparation of colours, techniques for painting draperies, flowers, trees, landscapes and portraits. First published as Traité de la peinture en mignature, Paris, Christophe Ballard, 1674, it rapidly became one of the most influential painting manuals of the age. This is its first appearance in English. It was extremely popular and was reprinted in 1730, 1739, 1750 and 1752, all early editions now being very scarce.
    ‘And ‘tis certain, there are Thousands of Persons in Great Britain, as well as in other Nations, who have a greater Passion for this Art than they have Opportunity to cultivate it. THe Country affords but few Painters, whose Instructions are of any Value; and good Pieces of this kind are very rare among us; while great Numbers of both Sexes, of Fortune and Leisure, who with a Genius for Painting are devoted to a Country-Life, languish away many a heavy Hour for want of some Intelligence in this Art, which they might pass very agreeably with a little Skill in it: And, perhaps, a rural Life, or a Recess in the Country, cannot be sweeten’d by a more elegant Amusement’ (The Preface of the Translator, pp. viii-ix).

    ESTC n29989, at BL, Cambridge, Glasgow, Huntington and Clark only; OCLC adds V&A.

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  • prints for British tourists in Italy
    [The Four Elements.] Earth. Wind. Fire. Water. by HAMILTON, William RA (1751-1801), after.DALL' ACQUA, Giuseppe (1760-circa 1829), engraver.
    HAMILTON, William RA (1751-1801), after.
    DALL' ACQUA, Giuseppe (1760-circa 1829), engraver.
    [The Four Elements.] Earth. Wind. Fire. Water. Northern Italy, 1787.

    Four sheets, (362 x 260 mm), stipple-engraved prints, platemarks measuring 246 x 177 mm, the images presented in elegant slim ovals (198 x 98 mm), double ruled, each plate bearing an English title of one of the elements and signed ‘W. Hamilton delinet’ and ‘Giuseppe dall’ Acqua di Cristoforo scul. 1787’, the first print (Earth) also with ‘no. 343’, two pin-holes at the top of each sheet, with very light creasing and soiling but generally a very fresh, clean set with generous margins.

    A lovely set of this rare series of prints depicting the Elements. This is a charming Italian and English collaboration, engraved and printed in Italy… (more)

    A lovely set of this rare series of prints depicting the Elements. This is a charming Italian and English collaboration, engraved and printed in Italy from an original by an English artist, using English language headings and presumably sold in Italy to an English market. The combination of the English artist and the use of English titles would have had a particular appeal to the traveller on the Grand Tour. The prints may have originally been published by a London print gallery, to whom Hamilton supplied a number of drawings, but we have traced no other version.
    The British painter William Hamilton had initially trained as an architect but was sent to Italy by the neoclassical architect Robert Adam, who employed both Hamilton’s father and the young Hamilton, whose first job was working for Adam as a decorative painter. Hamilton spent two years in Rome where he studied under the painter Antonio Zucchi, who later married Angelica Kauffman. On his return to England Hamilton established a reputation for himself painting theatrical portraits and illustrating scenes from Shakespeare. He was commissioned to create works for Boydell’s Shakespeare Gallery and was one of three principal illustrators of Boydell’s illustrated edition of Shakespeare, a massive project which ran from 1786 to 1805. He also contributed illustrations to Bowyer’s History of England and Thomas Macklin’s Bible, many of which were widely reproduced and sold as popular prints. Hamilton’s style was reminiscent of the cult of sentiment prevalent at the time and his work was clearly influenced by Angelica Kauffman and Henry Fuseli. These classical representations of the four Elements are typical of Hamilton’s output in combining sentimental interpretation with distinctively dramatic settings.
    Giuseppe dall’Aqua was a northern Italian engraver, son of the engraver Cristoforo dall’Aqua (1734-1787). A native of Vicenza, he began his career as an apprentice in the Remondini press of Bassano, where it is thought he continued to work for some years. In 1791 he became beadle of the Accademia Olimpica in Vicenza and later moved to Verona and Milan. Dall’Aqua is known to have copied many prints from the prolific Italian printmaker Francesco Bartolozzi (1727-1815), who worked in London.
    ‘[Hamilton’s] pleasantly plump and youthful figures were better suited to the less pretentious format of book illustration than that of history painting. His attractive romantic scenes appear in many editions of 18th century poets ... Hamilton was capable of being an accomplished draughtsman in a variety of styles; his album of drawings (London, V&A) includes work reminiscent of Henry Fuseli and Angelica Kauffman as well as more distinctive compositions nervously constructed with repeated, scratchy strokes of the pen’ (Geoffrey Ashton in Grove Dictionary of Art, online).

    We have traced only one copy of these prints, a coloured and framed set appearing at auction in Rome, 28 October 2014. In addition to the V&A album cited above, the Huntington Library has another sketchbook of drawings by Hamilton.

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  • The Rudiments of Ancient Architecture, by [RUDIMENTS].
    [RUDIMENTS].
    The Rudiments of Ancient Architecture, in two parts. Containing an Historical Account of the Five Orders, with their Proportions and Examples of each from the Antiques; also Vitruvius on the Temples and Intercolumniations, &c. of the Ancients. Calculated for the Use of those who wish to attain a summary Knowledge of the Science of Architecture. With a Dictionary of Terms. Illustrated with Ten Plates. London, Taylor, 1789.

    First Edition. 8vo, (250 x 152 mm), engraved frontispiece (detached) and pp. [iv], vii, [i], 84, engraved portrait by Basire on the title-page, with nine further plates bound after the text, uncut throughout in the original paper-backed marbled boards, spine chipped and largely missing, boards dust-soiled, some spotting in the text but generally good and clean.

    A delightful anonymous guide to the orders of classical architecture ‘intended more for the gentleman than the artist’. The work saw considerable success, leading to… (more)

    A delightful anonymous guide to the orders of classical architecture ‘intended more for the gentleman than the artist’. The work saw considerable success, leading to further editions in 1794, 1804, 1810 and 1821 but the identity of the author remains unknown. The frontispiece shows the five orders drawn to the same height so that their relative proportions can be easily seen. The first part of the work gives a general introduction, the second adds details of Sacred Buildings by Vitruvius and the work concludes with a dictionary of architectural terminology. The nine further plates include one for each order, Tuscan, Doric, Ionic, Corinthian and Composite, a plate each with details of bases and mouldings, and two final plates in which the individual parts of the columns are labelled.
    A second edition, ‘much enlarged’, was pubished in 1794, also for I. and J. Taylor at the Architectural Library in Holborn. The engraved portrait on the title-page is of James Stuart, known as ‘Athenian Stuart’.

    ESTC t46905, listing BL, Cambridge, Oxford; Columbia, Getty, Johns Hopkins, Bancroft, Delaware and Nebraska-Lincoln.

    Avery 882.

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  • preparation of paints and varnishes
    Traité théorique et pratique sur l’art de faire et d’appliquer les vernis; by TINGRY, Pierre François (1743-1821)
    TINGRY, Pierre François (1743-1821)
    Traité théorique et pratique sur l’art de faire et d’appliquer les vernis; sur les différens genres de peinture par impression et en décoration, ainsi que sur les couleurs simples et composées: accompagné de nouvelles observations sur le copal; de notes historiques sur la nature des matières et sur les procédés mis en usage par les compositeurs des couleurs et de vernis, et par les peintres vernisseurs et décorateurs, &c. &c. &c. An XI. (1803).

    First Edition, Fine Paper Copy. Two volumes, 8vo, (198 x 124 mm), pp. [iv], xlviii, 326, [1] errata, [1] blank; [iv], 351, [1] errata, woodcut device on each title, with five etched plates (four folding) in vol. 1 and a folding printed table in vol. 2, printed on thick, blue tinted paper, in contemporary mottled calf, flat spines attractively gilt in compartments, with orange and black lettering pieces, a circular numbering piece in contrasting orange on the black label, lettered and numbered in gilt, with red sprinkled carmine edges, liberally applied leading to the partial closure of a couple of pages, a little rubbed at extremities but a handsome set, with the bookplate of the Bibliothèque de Mr. de Barante on the pastedowns.

    A lovely copy of this important work on varnishes, printed on thick, blue paper and retaining its attractive contemporary binding. This fine paper copy feels… (more)

    A lovely copy of this important work on varnishes, printed on thick, blue paper and retaining its attractive contemporary binding. This fine paper copy feels significantly more luxurious than the standard issue. The British Library copy, which is on thinner, white paper, measures a textblock thickness of only 18.5 and 20 mm compared to the 26 and 25 mm of the present copy.
    ‘A comprehensive treatise on the preparation and use of varnishes, paints and colors. Tingry gives descriptions and results of his many experiments and, in general, supplies the principles and operations which were missing in Jean Félix Watin’s L’art de faire et d’employer le vernis, Paris 1772, to which there are frequent references.’ (Cole 1287 describing the English edition.)

    Neville II, p. 558.

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