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  • [GENTLEMAN IN THE WEST OF ENGLAND.]
    A Letter from a Gentleman in the West of England to his Friend in London. London, 1753.

    Folio broadside, (370 x 245 mm), pp. 2, printed on both sides, with central fold largely cut through but holding at the edges, dated in manuscript on the verso ‘March ye 13th 1753’.

    A scarce broadside written in response to ‘An act for the encouraging industry in the kingdom, by removing certain disabilities and restraints contained in several… (more)

    A scarce broadside written in response to ‘An act for the encouraging industry in the kingdom, by removing certain disabilities and restraints contained in several former Acts’. The author laments the decline of trade in his West Country town, which he blames on the restrictive practices of the corporation and the apprenticeship rules of the various trades. He argues strongly for the abolition of privileges of corporations, companies, apprenticeships whose restrictions do such harm to local communities.
    ‘The Effect of the Statute of Queen Elizabeth, which forbids all Persons to employ themselves in various Trades, who have not been Apprentices to them, is plainly this; that none learn any of those Trades, but Boys; and that none exercise them during their Lives, but such as chanced to begin with them. Now... particular Trades usually depend on such a variety of Circumstances, both in our own and foreign Nations, that it is scarce possible for them to continue many Years without Increase or Decrease. And whenever there is either a larger or less Demand, than has been usual, for any kind of Manufacture; that Manufacture must, under this Regulation, either want Hands, or be over-burdened with them. But it is equally detrimental to the Nation, that there should be Work without Workmen, or Workmen without Work’.

    ESTC n54414, listing Birmingham, BL, Exeter, Columbia, Harvard and Huntington.

    Kress 5369; Higgs 713.

    View basket More details Price: £175.00
  • DODD, William (1729-1777).
    An Oration delivered at the Dedication of Free-Masons’ Hall, Great Queen-street, Lincoln’s-Inn-Fields, on Thursday, May 23, 1776... Published by General Request, under Sanction of the Grand Lodge. London, Robinson, 1776.

    First Edition. 4to, (275 x 220mm), pp. [iv], 16, [4], uncut throughout, partly unopened, stab-sewn in the original wrappers as issued.

    An excellent, unsophisticated copy of this scarce speech given by the colourful and unfortunate William Dodd, poet, dramatist, cleric and forger. A prolific author, in… (more)

    An excellent, unsophisticated copy of this scarce speech given by the colourful and unfortunate William Dodd, poet, dramatist, cleric and forger. A prolific author, in addition to his theological works, Dodd wrote several plays, numerous poems, including The African Prince, 1749 (telling the story of the rescued slave, William Ansah Sessarakoo), a ‘rather loose novel’ called The Sisters, 1754 and a compilation, The Beauties of Shakespeare, thought to be where Goethe first discovered Shakespeare. Dodd’s greatest success lay in his powers of oratory. He was enormously popular and effective as a preacher and his sermons on behalf of charities, such as the ‘Magdalen House’, were much praised. Horace Walpole wrote in his Letters (iii, 282) that Dodd spoke ‘very eloquently and touchingly’, in the French style, and that many of his hearers were reduced to tears. However, scandal and increasing personal debt led him to forge a bond in the name of his patron, Lord Chesterfield, and he was arrested, committed for trial and convicted in February 1777. A flurry of pamphlets followed and there were numerous petitions on his behalf, one of which bore the signatures of twenty-three thousand people. Dr. Johnson tried to obtain a pardon for him, wrote several papers and petitions in his defence and wrote a sermon for him, which Dodd preached to his fellow-prisoners in Newgate chapel on 6th June. He was executed on 27th June 1777.
    The scarce pamphlet gives a short history of masonry and a celebration of its achievements. The final four leaves contain, after a separate title-page but with continuous register, ‘Proposals for printing by subscription, Free-masonry: or, a general history of civilization. In which the rise and progress of arts, sciences, laws and religion, will be detailed: together with an account of the lives of such sages and philosophers, eminent men and masons, as have added to the improvement and cultivation of mankind’. This larger work on the history of freemasonry, intended to have been two volumes quarto, was never produced. At the foot of the title-page is the note: ‘Any profits arising from the sale of this Oration, will be given to the Hall fund’.

    ESTC t105332, at BL, CUL, Bodleian, Folger, Grand Lodge of New York, Huntington, McMaster, North Carolina and Yale.

    View basket More details Price: £500.00
  • Catholics to leave London
    GWYN, Francis (1648-1734).
    An Order of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, assembled at Westminster, in the House of Lords, December 22. 1688. London, Awnsham and William Churchill, 1688.

    Large folio broadside (452 x 345mm, with a section of 30 x 154 cut from the lower left corner of the margin: no text missing). Single block of text beneath drop-head title, with list of names before and after text, large tear through the text to the central fold, with no loss, three folds.

    An important anti-Catholic proclamation issued just a few weeks after the landing of William of Orange at Brixham in Devon and the day before James… (more)

    An important anti-Catholic proclamation issued just a few weeks after the landing of William of Orange at Brixham in Devon and the day before James II fled England. The order requires that all Catholics, with a few exceptions, leave London within five days. The family of Alexander Pope was one of those affected but Pope himself was only a baby at the time.
    ‘The Lords Spiritual and Temporal... considering the great Mischiefs that have happened unto, and do still threaten this Kingdom, by the evil Designs and Practices of the Papists, in great numbers resorting unto, and abiding in the City of London, and places adjacent to the said City; For the better preservation of the Peace and common Safety, have thought fit, and do Order and Require, That all Papists, and Reputed Papists do, and shall, within Five Days after the Date hereof, depart from the said City, unto their respective Habitations; from which they are not to remove above Five Miles distance’.

    ESTC r213737, well held in the UK and Ireland (6 copies in London, 3 in Scotland, 4 in Oxford, 1 in Dublin) but only Harvard, Huntington, Newberry and Indiana in North America.

    Wing 2836A; Steele I, 3933.

    View basket More details Price: £450.00
  • Bonfires and Fireworks
    GWYN, Francis (1648-1734).
    At the Court at Whitehall, this Tenth of November, 1682... For the preventing tumultuous disorders which may happen thereafter upon pretence of assembling to make bonfires, and publick fire-works, and disappointing the evil designs of persons disaffected to the government, who commonly make use of such occasions to turn those meetings into riots and tumults. London, Henry Hills, 1682.

    Folio broadside (375 x 285), text (but not title or imprint) printed in black letter, large royal arms at the head, uncut, single fold.

    A scarce broadside proclamation forbidding the use of fireworks or the lighting of bonfires on public holidays. Issued during the reign of Charles II when… (more)

    A scarce broadside proclamation forbidding the use of fireworks or the lighting of bonfires on public holidays. Issued during the reign of Charles II when the November celebrations of the Gunpowder plot had become rather out of hand. Effigies of the Pope were regularly paraded and burnt at Temple Bar and anti-Catholic feeling in the capital was high, but the demonstrations were unscructured and increasingly violent.
    ‘By 1682 the November activities had lost their theatricality and flaunting mockery, and degenerated into rowdy confrontations. Gunpowder Treason day took on a sullen, festering mood with an air more of grievance than celebration. The Popish Plot had unravelled. No parliament was sitting, and the legislative road to exclusion was blocked. In terms of high politics the Whigs had lost their advantage, but anti-Catholic sentiment ran hotter than ever in the streets of London. Popular protest tied to Protestant anniversaries reached fever pitch in November 1682. There were no formal processions, now that the Whigs had crumpled and had their patronage withdrawn, but gunpowder Treason bonfires abounded. Energies that had been channelled towards ritual performance were now free to spill over into uncontrolled violence. Orchestration gave way to anarchy. In London the trained bands were readied and their numbers strengthened. Orders were issued ‘for preventing tumultuous disorders’ but with little effect’ (David Cressy, Bonfires and Bells, California 1989, p. 182).

    ESTC r27325, listing nine copies in the UK and Harvard, Huntington, Clark, Penn and Yale.

    Wing E798; Steele I, 3734; Goldsmiths 2485.

    View basket More details Price: £450.00
  • one of the English martyrs
    [POPISH PLOT]. CHARLES II (1630-1685).
    By the King. A Proclamation for apprehending certain Persons therein Named, Accused of High Treason. Given at Our Court at Whitehall the fifteenth day of January 1678/9. In the Thirtieth year of Our Reign. God save the King. London, John Bill, 1678/9.

    Folio broadside, (345 x 280mm), drop-head title under the royal arms, decorative initial, printed mostly in black letter, central fold, a good copy, manuscript shelf mark ‘(69)’.

    A scarce proclamation that led to the arrest and wrongful execution of Blessed John Gavan (1640-1679). Born in London to a family originally from Wiltshire,… (more)

    A scarce proclamation that led to the arrest and wrongful execution of Blessed John Gavan (1640-1679). Born in London to a family originally from Wiltshire, Gavan was educated at the Jesuit College at St. Omer and returned to take up his mission in Staffordshire, one of the strongholds of the Catholic faith in England. He took his final vows in 1678 at Boscobel, home of the Penderell family. Soon afterwards Stephen Dugdale learnt of the ceremony and accused all those present of plotting to kill the king. Dugdale was a much more convincing talker than Titus Oates had been and his accusation was readily believed, resulting in this warrant for the arrest of those involved. Gavan fled to London where arrangements were being made to smuggle him out of England when he was denounced by a spy called Schibber and he was arrested on 29th January. During his trial on 13th June, Gavan proved himself an excellent speaker, exposing the inconsistencies of the case against him. Nonentheless a verdict of guilty was brought in and Gavan, along with four others, was condemned to death and executed at Tyburn on 20th June. A large crowd assembled for the execution and is said to have stood in respectful silence during the hour long speeches from the victims and the final act of contrition led by Gavan.
    In addition to John Gavan, the proclamation calls for the arrest of several other Catholic priests, offers rewards for their apprehension and warns that anyone caught helping them will be guilty of high treason. The highest reward, of one hundred pounds, is offered for the capture of Francis Evers, alias Ewrie, alias Ireland. The other priests named on the document are Vavasor, alias Gifford, Edward Levison (Jesuits) and Broadstreet (’a Popish Priest’) for each of whom a reward of fifty pounds is offered. Each of the men listed are accused of being ‘guilty of late Damnable and Treasonable Plot for destruction of the Kings Royal Person, the Subversion of his Government, and for the Extirpation of the True Protestant Religion Established by Law within this Kingdom’.
    ‘And his Majesty doth hereby straitly forbid and prohibit any of his Subjects from Concealing, Sheltering, Relieving, or Receiving any of the said Offenders, under Peril of being themselves proceeded against (as by Law they may) for the Crime of High Treason’.
    Francis Evers had known Stephen Dugdale in the early years after his conversion to Catholicism and before he became a key informer in the Popish Plot. Despite the generosity of the reward offered here, neither he nor Edward Leveson were taken. ‘Of seven other Jesuits living in Staffordshire during the Popish Plot frenzy only two avoided arrest, Francis Evers and Edward Leveson, despite a proclamation of 1679 putting a price of £100 on Evers and £50 on Leveson; Evers escaped to St. Omer for a time’ (Michael W. Greenslade, Catholic Staffordshire 1500-1850, p. 139).

    ESTC r35887, listing ten copies in the UK and Folger, Harvard, Huntington, Penn and Yale in North America.

    Wing C3436; Steele I, 3676.

    View basket More details Price: £650.00
  • CHARLES II (1630-1685).
    By the King. A Proclamation for Prising of Wines. Given at our Court at Whitehall the Twelfth day of January 1677/8. In the Nine and twentieth year of Our Reign. God save the King. London, John Bill, 1677/8.

    Large folio broadside (333 x 510 mm), two sheets joined to make one, the royal arms at the top, drophead title, a little worn and crumpled around the edges, some dust-soiling, several folds.

    A scarce proclamation for the year 1678 setting out the fixed prices for all kinds of wines. The different kinds of wine are all listed… (more)

    A scarce proclamation for the year 1678 setting out the fixed prices for all kinds of wines. The different kinds of wine are all listed with the set price above which it is illegal to charge without penalty. The wines specified in the text are ‘Canary, Tents and Malagaes, Allecants, Sherries and Muscadels, French wines and Rhenish wines’. In each case the wholesale as well as the retail price is given, so that, for example, ‘Allecants, Sherries and Muscadels, be sold in Gross at Twenty seven pounds the Butt, and Nine pence the Pint by Retail’. Allowances are made for the pricing of wines that have to be transported more than ten miles from the port of entry.

    ESTC r213158, listing nine copies in the British Isles and Folger, Harvard, Huntington and Yale in North America.

    Wing C3372; Steele 3646; Goldsmiths 2244.

    View basket More details Price: £450.00
  • FILLASSIER, Jean-Jacques (1745-1799).
    Culture de la Grosse Asperge, dite de Holland, la plus précoce, la plus hâtive, la plus fécond & la plus durable que l’on connoisse. Traité qui présente les moyens de la cultiver avec succès, en toutes sortes de terres. Par M. Fillassier, des Académies d’Arras, de Lyon, de Marseille, & Corespondant de celle de Toulouse. Nouvelle Edition. Amsterdam, Méquignon, 1784.

    Second Edition. 12mo, pp. iv, 149, [2] table of contents,
    paper fault p. 67/68, touching the text,
    in contemporary half sheep over marbled boards, spine ruled in gilt, wanting the label.

    A comprehensive treatise on asparagus cultivation by Jean-Jacques Fillassier, educator, moralist and admirer of his Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His few works enjoyed considerable success: his first… (more)

    A comprehensive treatise on asparagus cultivation by Jean-Jacques Fillassier, educator, moralist and admirer of his Jean-Jacques Rousseau. His few works enjoyed considerable success: his first work Eraste ou l’Ami de la jeunesse, 1773, was reprinted several times and well into the nineteenth century; he also wrote a popular Dictionnaire historique d’éducation, 1771 and a Dictionnaire du jardinier français, 1789. He ran a tree-nursery at Clamart and was a member of several academies. It is interesting that he puts in a puff for the nursery in the Avis to the present work. Stating how hard it is to find asparagus without having it travel a long way, Fillassier advertises his own asparagus plants available for sale at Clamart sou Meudon, near Paris, at the price of 15 livres per thousand.
    First published in 1779, this was a very influential work and was published in numerous editions as late as 1815. A detailed study of all aspects of asparagus, Fillassier discusses its origins and nature and the history of its cultivation as well as giving detailed advice on suitable terrain, preparation of the asparagus beds and the care to be taken in its planting, in the first three years after planting and subsequently in the harvesting and cutting of the asparagus. The final chapter of the main text deals with the uses and properties of asparagus. This is followed by a question and answer section on various agricultural aspects, which concludes the work. The author includes detailed footnotes and quotations from other authors throughout.
    Despite its evident popularity, this work is now scarce in any edition. This edition is probably the most common, although OCLC lists only four copies in America (at UC San Diego, Hagley Museum, National Agricultural Library, Rutgers), and three copies in France.

    View basket More details Price: £450.00
  • anti-Hume tract, translated under Montesquieu’s supervision
    WALLACE, Robert (1697-1771).
    JONCOURT, Elie de (1700?-1770?), translator.
    Essai sur la différence du nombre des hommes dans les tems anciens et modernes, dans lequel on établit qu'il étoit plus considérable dans l'antiquité. Traduit de l'Anglois de M.R. Wallace, Chape;ain de S.M.B. & Membre de la Société Philosophique d’Edimbourg. Par M. de Joncourt, Professeur de langues etrangeres à Paris. ‘Londres’, ie Paris, 1754.

    First Edition in French. Small 8vo, pp. [ii], ii, ii, 292, several tables in text, in contemporary polished calf, spine gilt in compartments, red morocco label lettered in gilt, edges red, marbled endpapers: a very good, crisp copy.

    An excellent, fresh copy of the first French translation of Wallace’s Dissertation on the numbers of mankind in antient and modern times, first published in… (more)

    An excellent, fresh copy of the first French translation of Wallace’s Dissertation on the numbers of mankind in antient and modern times, first published in Edinburgh in 1753. ‘An acute and suggestive contribution to economics’ (Alexander Gordon in DNB), the work included a vigorous though unsuccessful attack on Hume’s Political Discourses, notably on his chapter on the ‘Populousness of Ancient Nations’. This French translation was made under the supervision of Montesquieu. A further English edition was published with a prefatory memoir in 1809.

    ESTC n7385; Cioranescu 34599; Chuo University, David Hume and the eighteenth century British thought, 222.

    View basket More details Price: £400.00
  • Family Tables; by TRUSLER, John (1735-1820).
    TRUSLER, John (1735-1820).
    Family Tables; being a collection of such tables as are useful to, and daily wanted in every family. London, W. Richardson for W. Nicoll, 1781.

    First Edition. 4to, (185 x 140 mm), pp. [iv], 1-43, tables printed horizontally and vertically, a few marks in corners of last few leaves, wrappers original and dark grey in colour, backstrip mainly defective with a couple of marks on covers.

    Apparently the only edition of a scarce book of tables for everyday family use. Simple mathematical tables such as Numeration and Multiplication tables are followed… (more)

    Apparently the only edition of a scarce book of tables for everyday family use. Simple mathematical tables such as Numeration and Multiplication tables are followed by more complex tables of expenses (by the day, week, month and year), tables of brokerage and commission and of interest and annuities. There is also a table of English regnal periods, guides to currency conversions between English, Irish and French currency (and Dutch cut diamonds) and various more obscure conversions such as one barrel of anchovies = 18lb and a dicker of gloves = 10 dozen pair. A number of tables relating to planters and gardeners is also included, such as a table to show how many trees or plants may be raised in an acre of ground, at different distances.
    An interesting character, this ‘eccentric divine, literary compiler, and medical empiric’ (DNB) John Trusler was a clergyman of apparently enormous energies. In addition to his numerous posts as curate, chaplain and lecturer, he established an academy for teaching oratory ‘mechanically’, went to Leiden to study medicine, ran the Literary Society (whose aim was to abolish publishers) and supplied printed sermons in imitation handwriting, to save clergy the trouble of writing their own. He was a prolific author, writing on a wide variety of subjects, including many self-help books. Trusler also established a lucrative printing and bookselling business, which included amongst its publications an edition of Hogarth’s works, a rhyming dictionary, an account of discoveries in the South Seas and various etiquette books. Many of Trusler’s works ran to numerous editions, but this appears to be the only edition of this work.

    ESTC t91031, at BL only; OCLC adds Guildhall.

    View basket More details Price: £1,200.00
  • Hints to Planters; by ASTLEY, Francis Dukinfield (1781-1825).
    ASTLEY, Francis Dukinfield (1781-1825).
    Hints to Planters; Collected from various authors of esteemed authority, and from actual observation. Manchester, R. & W. Dean, 1807.

    First Edition. 8vo (185 x 110mm), pp. [vi], [7]-63, [1], with errata slip, in the original publisher’s red quarter morocco over marbled boards, covers and spine worn, extremities bumped, spine ruled and lettered in gilt, faded, with the contemporary ownership inscription of Tho. Moore.

    A delightful guide to the care of English trees written by a young landowner who only a few years previously, at the age of 21,… (more)

    A delightful guide to the care of English trees written by a young landowner who only a few years previously, at the age of 21, had won a medal for planting 40,000 trees on his recently inherited estate in Cheshire. The work is presented in 24 chapters on different varieties of deciduous and evergreen trees, followed by an appendix on raising trees from seed. Dedicated to ‘the president and gentlemen’ of the Manchester Agricultural Society and with a short preface in which Astley states that his work includes the opinions of authors ‘esteemed for their knowledge of the various species of trees’ and offers this work in the hope that ‘these gleanings and humble hints may be of some trifling service’.
    Francis Astley seems to have been an interesting character: as well as being an enlightened landlord, he was an amateur artist and a poet, author a number of poems including Varnishando: a serio-comic poem, 1809 and The Graphomania: an epistle to John Harden, London 1809. He appears, however, to have been dogged by ill-fortune throughout his adult life, losing his first born child in a tragic accident. He was declared bankrupt in 1817 and the books from his library at Dunkinfield Lodge were sold at auction in Liverpool later that year. Scandal surrounded his death and there were accusations of murder as recounted in this biographical sketch:
    ‘John Astley died in 1787 leaving as his heir his young son, Francis Dukinfield Astley (1781-1825). In 1793 his widow married again, but the family continued to live at Dukinfield Lodge, and Francis seems to have taken up his responsibilities as landowner before coming of age, since as early as 1802, when he was 21, he was awarded a medal for planting 40,000 trees. Francis was a young man of great promise: he was rich, relatively good looking, artistic (he was a published poet and amateur artist), and had a deep concern for the welfare of his tenantry and estate. In 1812 he married and the following year he bought the Fell Foot estate in the Lake District, where he could enjoy fabulous views over Windermere. But tragedy was never far away. His first born son died when just a few weeks old from a fall from a window, and in his efforts to develop his estate and protect his tenants from the worst effects of the depression in trade occasioned by war with France he over-reached himself financially, and in 1817 he was declared bankrupt. However, the discovery of coal on his estate restored his fortunes without the loss of his property, and after many barren years his wife presented him with a son and heir in 1825. But just a few months later he died in his sleep while visiting his brother-in-law, Thomas Gisborne, in Derbyshire. There were accusations of murder, made in a scandalously public way at Astley's funeral, but an independent inquiry which Gisborne instigated to clear his name found no evidence of foul play and declared the death to be 'by visitation of God'. Some doubt must remain, however, as there seems to have been no autopsy, and because just a year later Gisborne married Astley's widow, his deceased wife's sister’ (Nicholas Kinglsey, ‘Landed Families’ blog).

    OCLC lists BL, Cardiff, Manchester, Delaware, Cornell, Harvard, UC Berkeley and Chicago Botanic Garden.

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  • [PROCLAMATION.]
    His Majesties most Gracious and General Pardon. London, Charles Bill, Henry Hills & Thomas Newcomb, 1688.

    Broadside, folio, (460 x 315 mm), caption title below arms, elaborate decorated initial, proclamation signed ‘Clerk’, printed on one side only, in one column, folded, clean tear through the text just beyond the central fold, with no loss, left margin cut close to text below the fold (measuring 340 mm above the fold), otherwise uncut, slightly creased at folds and edges.

    One of several versions of the general pardon issued by James II at the start of his reign concerning crimes against the state prior to… (more)

    One of several versions of the general pardon issued by James II at the start of his reign concerning crimes against the state prior to his accession. The pardon was issued with certain notable exceptions, particularly regarding Catholics. Mentioned by name as specifically excluded from the pardon are several of those implicated in the Popish Plot, including Titus Oates, Francis Charleton, John Wildman and Robert Peyton. Specific crimes of a notorious nature are also excluded and set fines already agreed in court are not to be lifted. Furthermore, anyone fleeing justice is given until 1st January 1689 to hand themselves over to the Chief Justice or a Justice of the Peace.

    ESTC r216451, at BL (3), Trinity Cambridge, Guildhall, NLS, Oxford (3), Folger, Harvard and Clark.

    Wing J213; Steele I, 3875.

    View basket More details Price: £400.00
  • JAMES II (1633-1701).
    His Majesties Reasons for With-drawing Himself from Rochester. Writ with His own Hand, and Ordered by Him to be Published. Rochester, 1688.

    First Edition. Folio broadside, (350 x 200 mm), drop-head title printed in five lines, printed in Roman letter, the first two words of title printed in black letter, text printed on one side only, some browning, old stain in the centre, with a small piece of the lower section of the margin cut away.

    A poignant letter written by King James the night before he set sail from Rochester. He sets out his reasons for flight, complaining of the… (more)

    A poignant letter written by King James the night before he set sail from Rochester. He sets out his reasons for flight, complaining of the treatment he had received in London at the order of the Prince of Orange, who had arrested Lord Feversham, taken possession of the posts at Whitehall and sent three Lords to him at one in the morning commanding him to leave his palace the next morning.
    ‘After all this, How could I hope to be safe, so long as I was in the Power of one, who had not only done this to me, and Invaded all my Kingdoms without any just occasion given him for it, but that did by his first Declaration lay the greatest Aspersion upon me that Malice could invent, in that Clause of it which concerns my Son... I was born Free, and desire to continue so; and tho I have ventured my Life very frankly, on several Occasions, for the Good and Honour of my Country and am as free to do it again... yet I think it not convenient to expose my self to be Secured, as not to be at Liberty to Effect it; and for that reason do with-draw’.

    Wing J376.

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  • Histoire Detaillée by FALLE, Philip (1656-1742).LE ROUGE, Georges-Louis (1712-1790), translator.
    FALLE, Philip (1656-1742).
    LE ROUGE, Georges-Louis (1712-1790), translator.
    Histoire Detaillée Des Isles De Jersey Et Guernsey, Traduite De L'Anglois Par Mr. Le Rouge, Ingénieur Géographe du Roi & de S.A.S. M. le Comte de Clermont. Paris, la Veuve Delaguette & Duchesne, 1757.

    First Edition in French. 12mo (158 x 90 mm), pp. [ii], iv, [ii], 181, [3], including one whole page woodcut diagram and two part page woodcuts in text, two large folding maps (330 x 225 mm and 315 x 425 mm), two small wormholes at the head of the first three leaves, in contemporary mottled sheepskin, corners and headcaps chipped, smooth spine divided into six panels with gilt compartments, lettered in the second on a tan label, the others tooled with a flower, stars and sprigs, edges of the boards tooled with a gilt roll, plain endleaves, red edges, preserved in a recent quarter red goatskin box, spine lettered in gilt.

    A delightful copy of this scarce French translation of Philip Falle’s historical account of the Channel Islands, translated by Le Rouge, who also supplied the… (more)

    A delightful copy of this scarce French translation of Philip Falle’s historical account of the Channel Islands, translated by Le Rouge, who also supplied the folding map of the islands and commends the map by Dumaresq as ‘sans contredit la meilleur jusqu’à présent’. Born on Jersey, Falle’s An Account of the Isle of Jersey, the Greatest of those Islands that are now the only Remainder of the English Dominions in France, London, John Newton, 1694, was the printed first account of the island. Falle also supplied the description of the Channel Islands for Bishop Gibson's 1722 translation of Camden's Britannia, and in 1734 he published an enlarged version of his history of Jersey.

    OCLC lists four copies in continental Europe and Cambridge, Leeds, Dartmouth (UK), Bodleian, Harvard and Goucher.

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  • dedicated to the ‘noble lords... and adventurers’ of the Virginia plantation
    MARKHAM, Gervase (1568?-1637).
    Hungers Prevention: or, The whole art of Fovvling by Water and Land. Containing all the secrets belonging to that art, and brought into a true forme or method, by which the most ignorant may know how to take any kind of fowle, either by land or water. Also, exceeding necessary and profitable for all such as travell by sea, and come into uninhabited places: especially, all those that have anything to doe with New Plantations. By Gervase Markham. London, Francis Grove for Martha Harrison, 1655.

    SECOND EDITION. 8vo (135 x 85 mm), pp. [xvi] including the woodcut frontispiece, 285, [1], woodcut initials and pictures throughout the text, some browning in text, in contemporary sheep, later spine label lettered ‘Fowling’, slightly rubbed with some small worm damage and rubbing to boards and extremities, contemporary annotation, possibly shelf mark, to title-page, both pastedowns sprung but still present, with the early ownership inscription of ‘J. Cooke Gaiborough’ to the verso of the upper board.

    A lovely unsophisticated copy in a contemporary binding of an important seventeenth century title, first published in 1621. Extensively illustrated with woodcuts, this is the… (more)

    A lovely unsophisticated copy in a contemporary binding of an important seventeenth century title, first published in 1621. Extensively illustrated with woodcuts, this is the first English treatise devoted to bird-catching and contains descriptions and illustrations of the necessary equipment, including nets, springs, hounds and guns. Particular details are given on decoys, elaborate water-fowl traps and the training and grooming of hounds and ‘water doggs’, as well as on the different kinds of nets etc used to trap each species. Chapter XII, ‘Of the taking of Hawkes of all kindes and all Ages’, contains striking woodcut illustrations of the Haggard Falcon and the Goshawke (pp. 182-183).
    As mentioned on the title-page, the work was published both for use at home and in the newly established colonies of America. The second dedication is addressed ‘To all the most Worthy and Noble Lords, Knights, Gentlement, and Merchants, Counsellors, and adventurers for the blessed plantation of Virginia’.
    A hands-on volume, with step-by-step practical tips, this is a work that would have been widely used in the field and as such is more commonly found heavily restored or in modern bindings. This is a delightful survival in a simple, seventeenth century binding.

    Wing M657; ESTC r12445; Swerdt, Hunting, Hawking and Shooting, II, 12; F. Poynter, A Bibliography of Gervase Markham, p. 135.

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  • COYER, Abbé Gabriel-François (1707-1782).
    La Noblesse Commerçante. ‘Londres’ ie Paris, Duchesne, 1756.

    Early Edition; Early Edition; Early Edition; First Edition. Together four works in two volumes, 12mo, (158 x 90 mm), pp. 141, ship ornament on the title-page; v, [i], 210; 40, last two gatherings of Arcq slightly dampstained running to fairly heavy dampstaining in the top corner of the Seras; volume II: pp. 152, 206, [2] advertisements, in contemporary speckled calf, some light wear to extremities and one tiny wormhole of spine, otherwise a very good copy, spines gilt in compartments with morocco label lettered in gilt, marbled endpapers, all edges red, with an unmarked contemporary armorial bookplate in each volume.

    A very scarce early edition of Coyer's famous work, one of several published the same year as the first edition, bound together with three other… (more)

    A very scarce early edition of Coyer's famous work, one of several published the same year as the first edition, bound together with three other related works. Coyer’s argument that the French nobility should take charge of commercial enterprises provoked widespread debate and numerous printed responses. The present copy is bound with two attacks on Coyer’s work and Coyer’s subsequent defence of his position. The first attack is the chevalier d’Arcq’s La Noblesse Militaire, a refutation of Coyer’s work, in which he argues that the natural profession of nobility is military. 'Ne pas écarter la noblesse de sa vocation propore qui est l'art militaire. Par ailleurs, le développement de notre commerce a des limites.' (JNED). The second attack is the less well-known Le Commerce Ennobli by an obscure writer called Seras, the crux of whose argument is the indigence of the nobility: ‘La Noblesse, comme les corps organisés, perd sans cesse par la dissipation; il lui faut de même un suc nourricier qui répare ses pertes. Si elle dissipe & ne répare pas, elle deviendra un corps fantastique & sans force’ (pp. 16-17).
    The final work in this collection is the first edition of Coyer’s Développement et Défence du Systeme de la Noblesse Commerçante, the defense that he wrote against the many criticisms of his system and particularly against the Chevalier d'Arcq's La Noblesse Militaire. ‘Plus littéraire qu'économique. Ce 'système' peut parfaitement exister dans le royaume ; il y va du plus grand intérêt de la France, tant au point de vue du commerce et de l'agriculture que de la population’ (INED, 1227).

    Coyer: Higgs 1205; Kress 5503.
    Arcq: Higgs 1209; Goldsmiths 9138.
    Seras: Higgs 1207; Kress 5568.
    Coyer: Higgs 1478; Goldsmiths 9241; Kress 5597.

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  • VOLTAIRE, François Marie Arouet de (1694-1778).
    Le Siècle de Louis XIV. Publié par M. de Francheville conseiller aulique de sa Majesté, & membre de l’acadénie roiale des sciences & belles lettres de prusse. Tome Premier [-Second]. Berlin, Henning, 1751.

    First Edition. Two volumes in one, 12mo, (144 x 85mm), pp. [xiv], 488, [1] errata; [ii], 466, [2], errata, with the half-title to the first volume, in contemporary calf, rather worn, spine gilt in compartments, foot of spine chipped, wormhole to the head of spine, wanting the front endpaper, red edges.

    The first edition of Voltaire's brilliant historical study of the age of King Louis XIV. Begun as early as 1732, Voltaire sent a manuscript version… (more)

    The first edition of Voltaire's brilliant historical study of the age of King Louis XIV. Begun as early as 1732, Voltaire sent a manuscript version to Frederic II who was enthusiastic and encouraged its publication. In 1739 Voltaire published a ‘Plan Raisonné’ of the project, including two finished chapters, but this was condemned by the court and seized. In 1750 Voltaire left France for Frederic’s court at Berlin, where he set himself to complete the work. Failing to obtain the ‘privilège royal’ or even the non-written ‘permission tacite’, he decided to go ahead and publish the work in Berlin at his own expence. Voltaire continued to add to the work in subsequent editions, most notably in the 1753 Berlin edition, where he added a supplement in which he refuted the attacks made by La Beaumelle.
    $1800

    BN Voltaire Catalogue 3361-3363.

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  • JOHNSTONE, James de, Chevalier (1719-1800).
    Memoirs of the Rebellion in 1745 and 1746. By the Chevalier de Johnstone... Containing a Narrative of the Progress of the Rebellion, from its commencement to the Battle of Culloden; the Characters of the Principal Persons in it, and Anecdotes respecting them; and various important particulars relating to that contest, hitherto either unknown or imperfectly understood. With an Account of the Sufferings and Privations experienced by the Author after the Battle of Culloden, before he effected his escape to the Continent, &c. &c. Translated from a French MS. originally deposited in the Scots College at Paris, and now in the hands of the publishers. Second Edition, with additional notes, &c. London, Longman, 1821.

    Second Edition. 8vo, engraved folding map and pp. lxxii, 456, two engraved portraits, in contemporary half calf over marbled boards, slightly worn, extremities and head and foot of spine a little bumped, spine simply ruled and lettered in gilt, with the bookplate of Montgomery Burnett.

    First published in 1820, this is the second of several editions of this important account of the '45 by the aide-de-camp to the Young Pretender.… (more)

    First published in 1820, this is the second of several editions of this important account of the '45 by the aide-de-camp to the Young Pretender. James Johnstone, known as the Chevalier de Johnstone, joined the Jacobite Army in Perth shortly after the raising of the standard at Glenfinnan in 1745. He was twenty-six years old and ‘as proud of his kinship with Scots nobility as any Highlander’ (John Prebble). He served as aide-de-camp both to Lord George Murray and to Prince Charles Edward, and fought with the Jacobites through the remainder of the campaign. After Culloden, Johnstone had a number of narrow escapes, hid in Edinburgh and London, and finally made his way to Holland disguised as a maidservant to Lady Jean Douglas.

    ‘A very interesting work, written under the influence of disappointment and ill-humour, and therefore to be read with caution. Some of the stories narrated are altogether fictitious’ (Lowndes).

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  • ‘one of the original writers on the sport’
    The Angler’s Vade Mecum: by CHETHAM, James (1640-1692).
    CHETHAM, James (1640-1692).
    The Angler’s Vade Mecum: Or, a Compendious, yet full, discourse of Angling: Discovering the aptest Methods and Ways, exactest Rules, properest Baits, and choicest Experiments for the catching all manner of fresh Water Fish. Together with a brief Discourse of Fish-ponds, and not only the easiest, but most Palatable ways of dressing of all sorts of Fish, Whether belonging to Rivers, or Ponds; and the Laws concerning Angling, and the Preservation of such Fish. The Third Edition, Illustrated with Sculptures: and very much Enlarged. London, William Battersby, 1700.

    Third Edition, ‘Very Much Enlarged’; issue (a) with phrase ‘illustrated with sculptures’. 8vo, (157 x 94mm), pp. [viii], 326, [10], with the two engraved plates, bound facing each other after the preface, tears through text on B3 and B7, with no loss but rather fragile, the chapter on ponds (Chapter 38, pp. 243-251) marked up by an early owner, in contemporary panelled calf, plain spine, foot of spine chipped, sprinkled edges, with the later booklabel of Commander E.R. Lewes.

    An attractive copy in an elegant, contemporary binding, of this important early fishing manual. First published anonymously in 1681, Chetham’s detailed account of the art… (more)

    An attractive copy in an elegant, contemporary binding, of this important early fishing manual. First published anonymously in 1681, Chetham’s detailed account of the art of fly-fishing reveals a wealth of personal experience and skill and is written in a clear, concise and frequently witty manner. Chetham’s study covers all aspects of the sport, including observations on the most commonly encountered fish, the different lines to be used, descriptions of the dub-flies to be used each month and instructions on protecting the fish and their habitats. Chetham also includes instructions for the dressing of different types of fish as well as numerous recipes for the baking, roasting, frying, broiling and stewing of the catch, together with instructions for such delights as ‘eel pye’ and the recipe for ‘an excellent French bread to eat fish with’.
    ‘Chetham’s prefaces are in Diogenes’ vein, curt and caustic; he escapes from the category of manual makers, and takes rank as one of the original writers on the sport. He is indebted, indeed, to his forerunners, but acknowledges it; he improves on their systems, and calls attention to the fact. He is never servile, nor plagiaristic, always honest, sometimes a little surly’ (Westwood & Satchell p. 60).
    One of two editions of 1700, this is a paginary reprint of the second edition of 1689. This issue has the phrase ‘illustrated with sculptures’ on the title-page and has the two engraved plates, each with six fishes and carrying the imprint ‘Printed for William Battersby at Thavies Inn Gate near St. Andrews Church in Holborn’. Seven of the fourteen errors listed in the errata of the second edition have been corrected. Copies of this work are seldom found in such good condition but are frequently rebacked or rebound and wanting one or both of the plates. Other than a couple of small tears, this is an excellent copy internally and externally.

    Wing C3791; Westwood and Satchell, Bibliotheca Piscatoria, pp. 59-60.

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  • DOGLIONI, Giovanni Nicolo (1548-1629).
    The Historian’s Guide. In Two Parts. First, the Recovery of Lost Time; being a Compendious Chronology of the World, from the Creation, to this Present Age. Translated out of Italian. Second, Englands Remembrancer; Being a Summary Account of all the Actions, Exploits, Battles, Sieges, Conflicts, &c. And all Remarkable Passages in His Majesty’s Dominions. London, Crook, 1676.

    First Edition in English. Small 8vo, (141 x 85mm), pp. [vi], 7-95, ‘86’, 89-122, [5] advertisements, pagination erratic but text complete, in contemporary mottled calf, gilt filet to covers, spine chipped at head and foot, simply ruled in gilt with red morocco label lettered in gilt, with the later booklabel of James Stevens Cox.

    A handsome copy of this scarce chronology. Written in two parts, the first seems to be the only English edition of Doglioni’s Compendio historico universale,… (more)

    A handsome copy of this scarce chronology. Written in two parts, the first seems to be the only English edition of Doglioni’s Compendio historico universale, a work which appeared in different forms and numerous different editions. This section has its own title page, immediately following the general title page, in which the sub-title is repeated and extended: ‘The Recovery of Lost Time, being a Compedious Chronology &c.... to our present Age, with the most notorious Remarks that have occurred, Whether Ecclesiastical, Political, Domestick, or Foreign’. This section (pp. 7-33) consists of fairly brief entries, getting more detailed in the later years and ending with the year 1664 (1661: The death of the most eminent French minister of State, Cardinal Mazarin; The overflowing of Rome, by the River Tiber. The Beatification of Francisco de Sales, Bishop of Geneva).
    The second and larger section is an anonymous work, also with its own separate title page: ‘England’s Remembrancer. Being a Summary of the Actions, Exploits, Battles, Sieges, Conflicts, and other remarkable Passages that have hapned in any of His Majesties Dominions, from Anno Domini 1600 until the present Year of 1675. Written by a Lover of his King and Country’. Starting in 1600, Nov. 19.: ‘King Charles the First, born at Dunfernling in Scotland’, this section also takes the form of a chronology, though a much more detailed one, mainly concerned with events from the 1640s to 1674. The short bullet points which are used to describe historical events during this turbulent period of history, and the fact that it is being written comparatively soon after the events, give the text an immediacy which makes for a very exciting read.
    This work is sometimes wrongly attributed to Samuel Clarke, who wrote another work under the same title.

    ESTC R202, listing several copies in England and Boston Public, Folger, Harvard, Huntington, Indiana, Clark, Vassar and Yale in America.

    Wing H2094A.

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  • HEATHCOTE, Ralph (1721-1795).
    The Irenarch: or, Justice of the Peace’s Manual. Addressed to the Gentlemen in the Commission of the Peace for the County of Leicester. By a Gentleman of the Commission. To which is prefixed, a Dedication to Lord Mansfield, by Another Hand. London, 1774.

    Second Edition. 8vo, (210 x 125mm), pp. [ii], lxxv, [i], 82, stabbing marks still visible throughout the margin from an earlier temporary binding, in contemporary quarter calf over marbled boards, plain spine with raised bands.

    A scarce history of the office of Justice of the Peace, with remarks on the duties of a justice, the importance of his office and… (more)

    A scarce history of the office of Justice of the Peace, with remarks on the duties of a justice, the importance of his office and the qualities needed to discharge it. It was first published, in a briefer form and without the dedication, in Leicester in 1771, although that edition is now particularly scarce (ESTC lists the Jesus, Cambridge and the Bodleian only). A further, expanded, edition was published in 1781.
    The dedication to Lord Mansfield, said on the title-page to be by another hand, takes up almost half of the work. The author addresses what he perceives as the country’s present degenerate state of manners: ‘The English, my Lord, are not what they were, in the days of their old honest plainness and simplicity: they are become very licentious and very unprincipled people: and it is not only in our Towns, but even in our Villages, that the more Vulgar are with difficulty kept within any reasonable bounds of subjection and order’ (p. ii).

    ESTC t104398, at BL, CUL, Glasgow, LSE, Rylands; Columbia, Harvard, Huntington and Macalester College.

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