Search

Criteria:
  • Tag = English Literature
  • HOBLER, John Paul.
    The Words of the Favourite Pieces, as performed at the Glee Club, held at the Crown and Anchor Tavern, Strand. Compiled from their Library, by J. Paul Hobler. London, Symonds, 1794.

    First Edition. Small 8vo, pp. [iv], 85, [6], in contemporary unlettered, freeform, tree calf, spine ruled in gilt, some wear.

    An important collection of lyrics for songs and rounds etc, as sung at England’s most notable glee club at the end of the eighteenth century.… (more)

    An important collection of lyrics for songs and rounds etc, as sung at England’s most notable glee club at the end of the eighteenth century. Included are songs by well-known musicians such as John Wall Callcott, Dr. Benjamin Cooke, Stephen Paxton and Samuel Webbe, including the latter’s ‘Glorious Apollo’ which became a traditional opening for glee club programmes. With an index.

    ESTC t110779.

    View basket More details Price: £250.00
  • The Works of Shakespeare. by SHAKESPEARE, William (1564-1616).
    SHAKESPEARE, William (1564-1616).
    The Works of Shakespeare. Glasgow, David Bryce, 1904.

    40 volumes, 64mo, (50 x 32 mm), each volume bearing a frontispiece with half-title on the recto, and with the dedication leaf ‘by Special Permission to Miss Ellen Terry’, printed on fine India paper, bound in contemporary green chamois leather, marble effect endpapers, central armorial device blind stamped on the front covers with blind stamped single fillet border extending across the spine to both covers, spines lettered in gilt, small chips to the spines of As You Like It, Venus & Adonis (split along joint) and King Lear (larger portion missing at foot of spine), the gilt faded to differing degrees by volume, the green colour of the reversed calf bindings faded along the spines and the front covers on volumes situated at the edge of the bookcase, gilt edges, the whole housed in the original plain polished oak swivelling bookcase.

    A delightful example of the most charming of David Bryce’s ‘Ellen Terry’ series of miniature literary sets. The 40 volumes include the plays, the sonnets,… (more)

    A delightful example of the most charming of David Bryce’s ‘Ellen Terry’ series of miniature literary sets. The 40 volumes include the plays, the sonnets, a biographical sketch and a glossary. The editor was J. Talfourd Blair.

    View basket More details Price: £1,500.00
  • VIDA, Marco Girolamo (ca. 1485-1566).
    PITT, Christopher (1699-1748).
    Vida's art of poetry, Translated into English Verse, by the Reverend Mr. Christopher Pitt, A.M. Late Fellow of New-College in Oxford, Rector of Pimperne in Dorsetshire, and Chaplain to the Right Honourable Philip, Earl Stanhope, &c. London, Palmer, 1725.

    First Edition. 12mo in sixes, pp. [iv], 118, wanting the advertisement leaf, in contemporary red morocco, single gilt ruled border to covers, flat spine simply ruled and lettered in gilt, all edges gilt, marbled endpapers with the armorial bookplate of Syston Park.

    First edition of Christopher Pitt's English translation of De Arte Poetica by Marco Girolamo Vida, bishop of Alba, first published in 1535. The poem had… (more)

    First edition of Christopher Pitt's English translation of De Arte Poetica by Marco Girolamo Vida, bishop of Alba, first published in 1535. The poem had long been popular on the continent but was only introduced to England in Tristram's Oxford edition in 1723. Pitt's translation went to a second edition in 1742. Born in Blandford, Pitt returned to his native Dorset after taking his MA at Oxford and spent the rest of his life in quiet scholarly seclusion at his living in Pimperne. He is mostly remembered for his translation of Virgil, thought by his many of his contemporaries to be superior to Dryden's translation for both beauty and accuracy. Johnson, however, was more circumspect: 'Dryden's faults are forgotten in the hurry of delight, and Pitt's beauties are neglected in the languor of a cold and listless perusal; Pitt pleases the critics and Dryden the people; Pitt is quoted and Dryden read'.
    On a tangent, it is interesting to note that this book was printed by Samuel Palmer, author of The Practical Part of Printing, 1729 and the uncompleted but important History of Printing finally published in 1732. It was in 1725, the year the present work was printed, that Benjamin Franklin 'got into work at Palmer's, a famous printing house in Bartholemew Close' and was to remain working there for a year. He notes in his autobiography that he was employed in composing Wollaston's Religion of Nature, but it is entertaining to conjecture that he might have had a hand in the present work. This is an attractive copy of Pitt's poem, bound in contemporary red morocco for the library at Syston Park.

    ESTC t98741.

    View basket More details Price: £600.00
  • SWIFT, Jonathan (1667-1745).
    DESFONTAINES, Abbé Pierre François Guyot (1685-1749), translator.
    Voyages de Gulliver. Tome Premier [-Second]. Paris, Guérin, 1727.

    First French Edition, First Issue. Two volumes in one, 12mo in eights and fours, pp. [vi], [vii]-xli, [v], 123, [1]; [125]-248; [vii], [i], 119, [1]; [121]-289, [3], with four engraved plates, unsigned, one to each part, in contemporary calf, sympathetically rebacked, spine gilt in compartments, red morocco label lettered in gilt, red edges, marbled endpapers, with the later bookplates of Henri Beraldi and La Goualante.

    Gulliver's Travels was an overnight best-seller in France. Following swiftly on the publication of the English text in late October 1726, the first French language… (more)

    Gulliver's Travels was an overnight best-seller in France. Following swiftly on the publication of the English text in late October 1726, the first French language edition, by an anonymous translator, appeared in the Hague in January 1727. This Desfontaines translation followed some three months later, in April 1727. Although it was less faithful to the original, being heavily abridged and at times almost closer to an adaptation than a translation, it was in Desfontaines’ version that Gulliver took France by storm. This is the first issue of the first appearance of that translation and the first publication of Gulliver in France. The Privilège du Roy, advertised at the foot of the imprint, had been granted to Hypolite-Louis Guérin on 20th March 1727. On the following day he shared it with two other local printers: 'faisant part du present Privilege aux Sieurs Gabriel Martin & Jacques Guérin'. Accordingly, the same printing of this first edition appears with two other imprints on the titles of both volumes.
    It was in this translation by Desfontaines’ that Swift’s work had a profound influence on French literature: ‘this shoddy but elegantly written version was repeatedly reissued in France well into the late 19th century, with a record 180 editions by the 1920s’ (Paul-Gabriel Boucé). Desfontaines went on to write his famous continuation, Le Nouveau Gulliver, which was also very popular and in turn saw translations into English, German and Italian. Graebar, who says that Desfontaines’ translation ‘outshines all later ones’, suggests that it was partly the abridged nature of Desfontaines’ version that ensured its success: ‘by reducing it to the expectations of his addressees, an approach that proved immediately as well as lastingly successful’.

    OCLC lists twenty copies, but only Getty, DLC, Delware, Illinois, Harvard, Princeton and Morgan in America.

    Cohen-de Ricci 210; not in Cioranescu; Teerink-Scouten 383.

    View basket More details Price: £800.00