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  • Tag = History and Society
  • ALMANAC.
    The Polite Repository or Pocket Companion, Containing with an Almanac the Births &c. of the Sovereign Princes of Europe. Lists of both Houses of Parliament, Officers of State, New Etiquette at Bath; and Ruled Pages for Occurrences, &d. &c. &c. To be Continued Annually. London, Peacock, 1781.

    First Edition. 12mo (115 x 70 mm), pp. 88, comprising: engraved frontispiece, [ii] title-page with contents on verso, [5] memorandum pages, blank within floral frame, [24] monthly pages each in double page spread, also within border, with the month in a scroll on the left hand page and the number of days in the month in a scroll on the facing, right-hand, page, [7] memorandum pages, blank within floral frame, all engraved, 41-88 printed almanac, densely filled with information in one, two, three or four columns, the memorandum leaves unused, several leaves trimmed close with loss of some of the floral and scroll borders, in a stunning contemporary binding of red morocco with elaborate onlays of dark blue and cream leather, covers with double border using hounds tooth and foliate roll on the outer red and inner black leather, the coloured leathers making an internal pattern of oval surrounds, with leaf and flower sprays, dog tools and central cornucopia, vibrantly gilt, three lines of verse pencilled in on a final blank and the note ‘Hammond’s Elegies’ in pencil on the final endpaper, marbled endpapers, gilt edges, preserved in a matching slipcase, which is predictably a little duller by comparison and a little rubbed.

    A suitably stunning copy of a very rare almanac listing the Great and the Good in every walk of society life. The text, in addition… (more)

    A suitably stunning copy of a very rare almanac listing the Great and the Good in every walk of society life. The text, in addition to the standard almanac, gives the births, deaths and marriages of all the sovereigns of Europe, the order of precedence in English society, the King’s Privy Council, the House of Peers, with their dates of creation, the Knights of the Garter, law officers, Lord Lieutenants, officers in the army, Fencibles in Great Britain, members of the House of Commons, with their seat and town of residence and a list of the Bankers in London. Brief light relief is provided in Necessary Information for such Persons who, for Health or Pleasure, may have occasion to visit Bath’. The final page gives ‘A Table of Weights and Measures’. The interactive part of this delightful volume precedes the main text and includes pages for notes and a calendar, all of which are engraved. Each month is given a double spread, with lines for the days across the two pages and the number of days in each month given in a scroll at the top. Either side of this are bound a number of unassigned memorandum pages which are blank within elaborate borders.

    ESTC t231784 and OCLC list National Library of Wales only.

    View basket More details Price: £1,800.00
  • AGAR-ELLIS, George James Welbore Dover, 1st Baron (1797-1833).
    The true history of the state prisoner, commonly called the Iron Mask, extracted from documents in the French archives. By the hon. George Agar Ellis. London, John Murray, 1826.

    First Edition. 12mo, pp. [iv], viii, 352, some scattered foxing in text, in contemporary half calf over marbled boards, spine gilt in compartments with green morocco label lettered in gilt, with a later bookplate messily removed, over a yellow one, torn and largely obscured, with the signature of M. Connolly Baldoyh (?).

    First edition of an important work about the so-called ‘Man in the Iron Mask’, the legendary figure long thought to have been the identical twin… (more)

    First edition of an important work about the so-called ‘Man in the Iron Mask’, the legendary figure long thought to have been the identical twin brother of Louis XIV. The mysterious man had been a captive of the French government since 1687 and was imprisoned in the Bastille in 1698 until his death in 1703, during all of which time his face had been hidden by a mask. The legend formed part of Dumas's brilliant novel Le Vicomte de Bragelonne, 1846, the most glorious and most dangerous of the adventures of the Three Musketeers, and the story was the subject of the MGM film, ‘The man in the Iron Mask’.
    Agar-Ellis's account, extracted from documents in the French archives, was translated into French and published as Histoire authentique du Prisonnier d’Etat, connu sous le nom de Masque de Fer, Paris, 1830. Dumas is known to have read it while he was researching the subject for his novel. Agar-Ellis was led to the conclusion that the masked prisoner was probably the Italian Antonio Ercole Matthioli, born December 1, 1640 at Bologna. Matthioli, an astute, clever man became the Secretary of State to the Duke of Mantua, a province of Italy. Matthioli became powerful and rich but his unscrupulous selling of a treaty drawn up by Louis XIV of France and the Duke of Mantua (whereby Louis pledged to buy the fortress at Mantua) to France's enemies resulted in him being kidnapped by French soldiers and held at Pinerolo for treason. The Duke of Mantua disowned him and Matthioli was kept masked for his own protection. The German historian Wilhelm Broecking came independently to the same conclusion seventy years later.

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  • the rise, union, power, progressions, separations and corruptions of poetry
    BROWN, John (1715-1766).
    Thoughts on Civil Liberty, on Licentiousness, and Faction. By the Author of Essays on the Characteristics, &c. Newcastle, White, 1765.

    [bound after:] ibid -
    The History of the Rise and Progress of Poetry, through its several Species. Written by Dr. Brown. Newcastle: Printed by T. White and T. Saint, for L. Davis and C. Reymers, against Gray’s-Inn-Gate, Holborn, London. 1764.
    First Edition; Second Edition. Two works in one volume, 8vo, (203 x 115mm), pp. History: vii, [i], [9]-266, [2] advertisements; Thoughts: 167, [1], in contemporary speckled calf, foot of spine chipped, some light surface wear to spine and extremities, red morocco label lettered in gilt.

    First edition of John Brown’s wide-ranging discussion of civil liberty, which includes comparisons of Great Britain with Sparta, Athens and Rome. Brown’s remarks on education… (more)

    First edition of John Brown’s wide-ranging discussion of civil liberty, which includes comparisons of Great Britain with Sparta, Athens and Rome. Brown’s remarks on education in this work provoked an attack from Joseph Priestley in An essay on a course of liberal education for civil and active life. With plans of lectures on I. The Study of History and general Policy. II. The History of England. III. The Constitution and Laws of England. To which are added, remarks on a code of education, proposed by Dr. Brown, in a late treatise, intitled, Thoughts on Civil Liberty, London 1765.
    The other work in the volume is Brown’s critical analysis of the development of poetry. Starting with a discussion of melody, dance and poetry ‘in the savage state’, Brown goes on to explore the origins of Hebrew, Indian, Chinese and Peruvian poetry and discusses at some length the development of various kinds of poetry in ancient Greece as well as in other European countries. This is a simplified edition under a new title of A dissertation on the rise, union, and power, the progressions, separations, and corruptions, of poetry and music, London 1763, with the section on music omitted. An advertisement leaf after the title informs the reader: ‘It is thought proper to inform the Purchasers of the ‘Dissertation on the Rise, Union, &c. of Poetry and Music,’ that the Substance of this Volume is contained in That; which is now thrown into the present Form, for the Sake of such classical Readers as are not particularly conversant with Music’.

    Thoughts: ESTC t789.
    History: ESTC t101765.

    View basket More details Price: £950.00